Malcolm D. Lee Will Direct LeBron James' New Space Jam Sequel

Malcolm D. Lee Will Direct LeBron James' New Space Jam Sequel
Credit: Source: Independent.co.ukl

According to a report from The Hollywood Reporter, Malcolm D. Lee, perhaps most famous for directing Girl's Trip, starring Tiffany Haddish and Jada Pinkett-Smith, will take Terence Nance's job in the Warner Brothers sequel to Space Jam.

Malcolm will sit in the director's chair of Warner Brothers' and LeBron James sequel to the classic 90s film, Space Jam. The Hollywood Reporter confirmed Lee will replace Nance in the sequel to the massive 1996 hit starring Michael Jordan.

The 1996 film has gone down in history as a classic film, featuring cameos from NBA's biggest stars, as well as iconic Disney characters such as Bugs Bunny and Elmer Fudd. Reportedly, Lee has worked with Universal TV's sister studio on a number of occasions, and typically, his films perform well and often by "wide margins."

Thus far, Night School has grossed $85.5 million against just a $29 million budget, and Girl's Trip earned more than 7x it's initial production budget of $19,000,000. Fans of Tiffany Haddish know that her appearence in both of the aforementioned films is arguably what launched her to success after years of performing as a stand-up comic.

Ryan Coogler, the Black Panther filmmaker, is producing the second Space Jam movie and he wrote the latest draft of the script with Sev Ohanian from Searching .

Opening in theaters on the 16th of July, 2021, Space Jam 2 will star Lebron James as well as Don Cheadle, who recently had a role in the latest Avengers film, Avengers: Endgame.

As it was briefly mentioned in passing above, the original 1996 flick Space Jam , grossed nearly $300 million on an $80 million budget, becoming the highest-grossing basketball film of all time.

Despite its commercial success and nearly acclaimed status among fans, Space Jam didn't perform as well with critics, with the movie receiving just a 43% rating on Rotten Tomatoes. Roger Ebert, however, writing for The Chicago Sun-Tribune at the time, stated the film was a "happy marriage of good ideas."

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