Meghan Markle Opens Up About Suffering A Miscarriage This Past Summer In Heartbreaking Essay

Meghan Markle Opens Up About Suffering A Miscarriage This Past Summer In Heartbreaking Essay
Credit: Source: nbcnews.com

Meghan Markle just released a very personal and vulnerable essay for the ‘New York Times,’ in which she revealed that she has unfortunately experienced a miscarriage this past summer! Check out what the former Duchess had to say!

As it turns out, amid pregnancy rumors, Meghan Markle really was expecting her and Prince Harry ’s second addition to the family.

RELATED: Meghan Markle Reportedly Still Cooks For Hubby Prince Harry Every Day!

However, sadly, the couple has lost the baby and now, Meghan is detailing the heartbreaking experience in an essay she wrote for the publication.

She revealed that she miscarried while changing her son, Archie’s diaper one day and when she realized it ‘I dropped to the floor. I sensed that something was not right. I knew, as I clutched my firstborn child, that I was losing my second.’

RELATED: Kate Middleton Was Not Impressed By Meghan Markle‘s Lavish Wedding -- What Is Pushing Prince William's Wife To Feel This Way?

Meghan and Harry were quick to go the hospital and she recalls ‘[trying] to imagine how [they’d] heal’ while staring blankly at the white walls.

‘Losing a child means carrying an almost unbearable grief, experienced by many but talked about by few,’ she added.

RELATED: Prince Harry Wants Meghan Markle To Reconcile With Her Father Thomas

Meghan Markle explained in her op-ed that she decided to write it in order to help others going through similar experiences.

To further exemplify the importance of people helping each other, she shared a personal story that involved her seeing a woman crying on the sidewalk while she was in a cab.

Meghan asked the cab driver if they should check up on her but they replied that someone else would undoubtedly stop and ask her if she was Okay eventually.

Advertisement

But Meghan still thinks about it: ‘Now, all these years later, in isolation and lockdown, grieving the loss of a child, the loss of my country’s shared belief in what’s true, I think of that woman in New York. What if no one stopped? What if no one saw her suffering? What if no one helped? I wish I could go back and ask my cab driver to pull over. This, I realize, is the danger of siloed living — where moments sad, scary or sacrosanct are all lived out alone. There is no one stopping to ask, ‘Are you okay?'’

Advertisement

You may also like

LEAVE A REPLY

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *