Actor Tim Norman Convicted Of Murdering His Nephew In A Pay-To-Play Scheme

Actor Tim Norman Convicted Of Murdering His Nephew In A Pay-To-Play Scheme
Credit: people

In 2016, James "Tim" Norman, star of the sitcom Welcome to Sweetie Pie, was convicted of hiring someone to assassinate his nephew and co-star.

The U.S. Attorney's Office for the Eastern District of Missouri announced on Friday that a jury had found 41-year-old Norman guilty of conspiracy to commit murder-for-hire, murder-for-hire, and conspiracy to commit mail and wire fraud in connection with the shooting death of his nephew Andre Montgomery Jr. in March 2016.

According to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, the jury deliberated for 17 hours over the course of three days before reaching a judgment.

U.S. Attorney's Office for the Eastern District of Missouri claims that Norman hired middlemen to kill his nephew, Montgomery, in 2015 so that he could collect on a fake $450,000 life insurance policy he had taken out on Montgomery.

The release noted that the life insurance policy made multiple fraudulent representations about Montgomery's salary, net worth, medical history, work, and family background.

Prior to trial, Norman's co-defendants, Travell Anthony Hill, Terica Ellis, and Waiel Wally Rebhi Yaghnam, all entered guilty pleas, as mentioned in the announcement.

According to the announcement, Hill and Norman met in St. Louis on the day Montgomery died, and Norman assured Hill that a woman would be calling with Montgomery's location. At 8:02 p.m., when Hill received a call from the woman, Terica Ellis, Hill fatally shot Montgomery with a.380-caliber revolver before disposing of the weapon and the phone. The $5,000 he requested was paid to him later.

On Tuesday, August 2020, Norman was arrested on federal charges and placed in the Madison County Detention Center, according to WLBT.

The outlet has obtained a charge sheet that claims Norman and Ellis, an exotic dancer, plotted to kill Norman's nephew in exchange for the life insurance payout.

According to the complaint, there is sufficient evidence to support the conclusion that James Timothy Norman colluded with Terica Ellis and/or others, the identities of whom are currently unknown to investigators, to execute a murder-for-hire in exchange for U.S. currency using a facility of interstate commerce, namely a cellular telephone.

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